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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 248 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
the kind of decisions that had to be made during katrina and other events. instead of having a set standard of care, even if it's an altered or austere standard of care, what we want to have is good decision framework. until you are in the situation you can't determine what you would actually be doing and what resources are still available. >> do we have other questions from our audience? one final question and this is for our civilians. you got to see all kinds of cool stuff yesterday down at moffat's field. i want to see if there's one or two that stuck out. >> i think the c130 definitely blew me away, the fact it can transport 92 people, patients, was incredible. the other 1 that stands out is the mobile decon patient, that it can decontaminate a patient that was not able to stand. >> the team from the hospital that i was with and the other hospitals really looked at what were their hands on capabilities and some of the things that stood out the most is a portable oxygen generator that sits in the corner of the shock trauma platoon unit and doesn't have to be hooked up to our large l
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
without power. >> new york gov. says hurricane sandy and katrina had a lot in common and none of it was good. superstar on sandy was worse in some ways compared to hurricane katrina. sandy did $42 billion worth of damage to new york. it costs more costly damage than katrina. >> in world news investigators had exhumed the palestinian leader to find out if he does poison by polonium. he died a decade ago after a sudden and severe illness. doctors from france, switzerland, and russia are going to take their own samples for independent analysis. authorities said high levels of the substance was found on araphats personal belongings. >> the fire that killed more than 100 textile workers by sabotage according to the bangladesh government. the worst ever industrial fire broke out on saturday and consumed in multistory factor. the interior minister said in a claccording to the investigation the fire was arson. >> coming up on the kron for a morning news we are following a developing story out of san francisco with the axis to and from treasure island on interstate 80 are closed due to
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
katrina you have a whole bunch of cars taken off the market because they're not usable and all of a sudden used car prices go up, 10, 20, saw the up 20% reported last week d all the way across, diesel oil. we're going to see i across the state it's not just a northeast issue. >> brenda: gary k, what do you think of that? >> toby is absolutely right. whenever you have shortages with an event like this, especially in highly populated area, lumber, building materials, we can run the gamut here. prices go higher and costs go higher to business and consumers and that will definitively effect an economy. especially still trying to get up. a very tough thing to watch. >> brenda: gary b. is it having an impact or limited and temporary? >> the latter brenda, yes. look, it's the less, less temporary and less limited, i think the closer you were to the northeast. so, people obviously on long island, new jersey are going to feel it the most in spikes in prices and people in california feel it less. toby makes a very good point about insurance rates, but i think back to katrina and i did not see, can't
the way from 9-11 through katrina to whatever the next catastrophe is going to be. we live in a nuclear age. who would have predicted the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the worl
table, with representatives donna edwards and aaron schock, paul gigot, katrina vanden heuvel and greta van susteren. >>> hello, again. what a week in politics. with his victory in florida yesterday, president obama now has a sweep of the battlegrounds. 332 electoral votes. losing only indiana and north carolina from his 2008 total. the popular votes are still coming in. the president will come up about 8 million short of his 2008 tally. but, he's holding about 3 million advantage over mitt romney. we'll discuss how obama did and what's next for the gop and the governing challenges ahead? >>> but first, that friday afternoon bombshell. david petraeus resigns at the cia after the fbi uncovers his extramarital affair. pierre thomas is here with the latest. first came upon this several months ago. >> yes, it came to light after a woman in tampa tied to military got a peculiar, harassing e-mail. the woman was so concerned, she contacted the fbi, who, then, according to our sources, traced it back to paula broadwell, who wrote a book about petraeus. as the fbi continued to investigate, they
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
through hurricane katrina know a thing or two about getting back on your feet. so, hundreds of them packed up and drove east to staten island, new york, to help those recovering from superstorm sandy. they say they're just returning the kindness that so many new yorkers showed them in their time of need. dan bowens of wnyw has more. >> new york, staten island, sandy ruined hundreds of homes and we found volunteers working hard to pick up the pieces. >> and the water height is where this is. >> flood waters reached above the windows inside randy's house and several people he didn't know helped him clear out the debris. >> touching, heart warming is not near enough a ward to describe how you feel when these things are going on. and people tyke time out of their life. >> and the neighbor was feeling overwelcomed, debris everywhere in the back yard and then this group just showed up and started cleaning. >> without the 25 hands with me, i wouldn't be able to do anything. >> among the hundreds of workers and volunteers, who come to staten island today and there are hundreds assisting with the c
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
that has gone back and forth from louisiana, katrina, and new york for 9/11 and back. now back again the brotherhood of firefighters that is straight ahead. >> those are two cities that share tragedy, have tragedy in common. katrina down there. 9/11 up here. now another one with sandy. so that bond -- that fire truck certainly represents that. >>> also, we'll lighten the mood a little bit in "the skinny," she says, maybe not too much. she is going to be fine. talking about brooke burke from abc's "dancing with the stars," when the word "cancer" is involved, we'll have to send her our very best thoughts and warm wishes. details of her condition. she is going to be okay the important thing. stay tuned for details coming up on that in "the skinny". >> what her doctors are telling her. our prayers and thoughts go out to her and her family. first, victims and relatives of those who died were in the courtroom as a judge reaffirmed that jared loughner would never again be a free man. >> as part of a plea deal, loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life terms plus 140 years. abc's matt
and local platforms, whether it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfe
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about the partnerships an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 248 (some duplicates have been removed)